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Breaking News:

BEEF DAYS SIGN UP SHEETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. ASK THE BARTENDER FOR THE BOOK.

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The Moving Wall will be in town on August 12th -16th. Check out The Moving Wall page to sign up for assisting.

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The Legion is now serving lunch from 11:30-2:30 daily!

Look for the daily specials on the board outside and on Facebook.

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Meetings in June

Legion Board meeting – 6/9 @ 5:00 PM

Legion Floor meeting – 6/9 @ 6:00 PM

Auxiliary – 6/7@ Legion

Riders 6/1 @ Legion

SAL 6/15 @ Legion

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A message from our Chaplain:

Before they call out to God or their mothers for help, they call out to us.”

Depending on the branch of service, the official military name is either Corpsman or Medic. Unofficially these men and women are simply known as “Doc.” There are some other names Medics and Corpsmen are called but I can guarantee you those other references are never spoken by those who are serving in combat areas or have served in combat. The name “Doc” is an unique name because it isn’t just a nick name; it is a title of respect that one must earn. Every time a Devil Doc (Fleet Marine Force Corpsman) or Combat Medic is transferred to a new company the process of earning the title “Doc” starts over. In the field, Docs carry the same things Marines and Infantry men carry plus their medical gear and extra water adding up to an additional 30 to 40 pounds. Docs are enlisted men and women medically trained in weeks not years. Even though they are not MD’s these enlisted Docs are medically skilled.

The survival rate for those wounded in WW II – 69.3%, Korea – 75.4%, Vietnam – 76.4%, Iraq and Afghanistan – 92%. These survival rates are largely due to the medical aid the wounded received within minutes on the battlefield. The use of helicopters and locations of field hospitals increase the likelihood of survival. The military medical teams are comprised of dedicated MD’s, nurses, and enlisted Medics or Corpsmen. Medics and Corpsmen not only work in hospitals, they are found in battalion aid stations, field hospitals, aboard ships and with combat units. Many US Navy ships have only one Corpsman responsible for the health and well being of an entire crew. On several occasions during WW II, Corpsmen assigned to submarine duty performed life saving emergency appendectomies, utilizing surgical instruments fashioned from silverware and a surgical textbook as a guide.

The Combat Medics and Devil Docs are more than band aides and ointments; they are skilled in treating everything from foot fungus to massive trauma. Docs are often trusted advisers in personal and spiritual matters; sometimes they are the couriers of the last words spoken. In battle Docs fight along side their buddies laying their weapons down only when someone is in need of medical care. Depending upon the situation Docs have to make the hard decision of prioritizing who is treated first. When the fighting stops the Docs are often alone still locked into mortal combat against the Grim Reaper of Death. Whenever possible a Doc never leaves the side of a dying brother or sister, all the while providing care and comfort to the very end.

Docs” of Legion Post 460

                                                                     Brad Storck, US Army                               Dustin Fordice, US Army

                                                                    Curt Phillips, US Army                              Ron Meyer, US Army

                                                                    Phil Yakish, US Army                                Steve Yakish, US Army 

                                                                   Chuck Panzer, US Army                           Wayne Croy, US Army

                                                                  Mark Rebal, US Army

                                                                  Doug Thompson, US Navy/Fleet Marine Force, US Army

* If I left off any name please forgive me, it was purely by accident

Doug Thompson, Chaplain  

dotandjot@aol.com          


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KITCHEN HOURS:

Breakfast:

Monday-Sunday 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Lunch:

Monday – Friday 11:30 AM – 2:30 PM

Please watch the Facebook page and website for the most up to date information.

Due to the Corona Virus we will not be having live music at this point. Please watch the web page and Facebook for any changes.